Home Spirituality Raven – Spiritual Meaning + Myths & Dream Interpretation

Raven – Spiritual Meaning + Myths & Dream Interpretation

Raven – Spiritual Meaning + Myths & Dream Interpretation

Spiritual Meaning Of Raven

From dark messengers of death to blackbirds bringing tragedy, ravens have gained an undeserved reputation over time. We will discover, however, that at its origin the raven was considered a solar symbol and was differently perceived by the nomadic people.

According to a study comparing the customs and beliefs of many peoples, the symbolism of the raven in its purely negative form was accepted recently and almost exclusively in Europe.

Indeed, its appearance in dreams is not considered auspicious, and it evokes the fear that you will suffer misfortune. It’s the blackbird of the romantics, flying over the battlefields to devour the bodies.

This concept seems to be recent and is found in India where, in Mahabharata, the ravens are compared to the messengers of death. And maybe in Laos, where the water touched by ravens can no longer be used in rituals.

Almost everywhere, however, in the Orient as well as in the West, the positive virtues of the raven are the basis on which its symbolism is built.

Therefore, in China and Japan, it is the symbol of filial gratitude; caring for one’s parents was considered the sign of a miraculous restoration of social order during the Han Dynasty.

In Japan, it symbolizes family love. It is also a divine messenger and auspicious bird, as it was considered in the Zhou era – the harbinger of victory and sign of virtue. It’s true that the raven in question was red, not black.

In China, the raven is a sunbird. Ten ravens brought the light of the world, a symbol that seems to belong to Shintoism.

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Myths & Legends

A symbol of perspicacity in the Making, the raven is the one who checks whether, after the flood, the earth begins to rise above the waters. In Greece, it is considered a solar symbol and is dedicated to Apollo.

A raven with three claws appears in the sun, according to the carved stones dating back to the Han Dynasty. It may be the one that animated the sun and possibly a representation of yang.

Similar to the tripod, the three claws (the emblem of China’s emperors) correspond to the symbol of the sun: sunrise, zenith, twilight.

The raven often appears in Celtic legends where it plays a prophetic role. Many toponyms contain its name. In Ireland, the war goddess Bodb is called the crow.

In fact, it plays a fundamental role in the Gallic tale called Ronabwy’s Dream. Owein’s ravens, after they were massacred by Arthur’s soldiers, react violently and kill the soldiers in turn.

The raven is often a subject of folklore. The Welshmen considered the raven a sacred bird. The German mythology turns the Ravens into Wotan’s birds and companions.

In Scandinavian mythology, two ravens sit on Odin’s throne, one is Hugin – the spirit and the other, Munnin – the memory. The two ravens might represent the principle of creation, and the two wolves – the principle of destruction.

As a messenger of the god of thunder, the raven appears in the Maya tribes (Popol Vuh). Its roles as a guardian and guide are also seen in Africa.

The likuba and likuala tribes in Congo consider the raven a bird that warns people about the dangers that lurk. It may also be the symbol of loneliness, or rather the willful isolation of the one who has decided to live on a higher plane.

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Moreover, it can be an attribute of hope, according to Suetonius. Alchemists have associated a phase of transmutation with the raven’s head.

In the native American folklore, there is an emphasis on this bird’s ability to metamorphose, symbolizing change. The spiritual healers conjure it in various rituals to clarify visions, because what is seen with the physical eye is not necessarily real, and the raven can provide clarification.

The Tlingit Indians on the Pacific West Coast consider the raven the central divine figure, the primordial demiurge, who spreads culture and civilization, adding a dynamic and organizing element.

Raven Dream Meaning and Interpretations

It is said that dreaming about a raven means you will have negative thoughts that will mess your love life, but if you dream of killing this bird, then you will enjoy friendship, affection, and harmony.

A very big raven in your dream indicates a loss and dreaming about hearing these birds may predict sadness, a great misfortune, or the fact that someone plots against you. But, a flying raven generally represents a good sign.

According to the Romanian tradition, many ravens in one place indicate hunger and the possibility of having many shortcomings in your life.

In other traditions, a raven predicts a divorce or a death in the family. If the raven in your dream looks into your eyes, you will meet a man who is lying a lot and is always mean to others; this person may be a common friend or a colleague.

Dreaming about hunting a raven represents others’ hatred against you and the fact that no one will appreciate what you are doing.

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Also, if you dream about a raven sitting on your shoulder, you will have a lot of bad luck, while dreaming it in your house indicates that the people who can not stand you will do their best to spoil your peace, especially within the family.

However, a raven that speaks to you in the dream brings good news because it is the equivalent of a spirit whose presence is auspicious.

A raven playing with a baby or a younger child may represent a warning to protect your children from diseases, and if you dream about a wounded raven, with broken wings, you will have to be patient because you are about to get a lucky chance.

References

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/feb/02/ravens-can-imagine
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/ravens-problem-solving-smart-birds/
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/nevermore-or-tomorrow-ravens

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